My MedlinePlus Weekly Newsletter: Are You on the Borderline?

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My MedlinePlus

November 18, 2020

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borderline diabetes, green running shoe, glucose monitor, water bottle, tape measure

Are You on the Borderline?

Borderline diabetes, also called prediabetes, means that your blood glucose or blood sugar levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Most people with prediabetes don't have any symptoms but are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. There are things you can do to prevent, delay, or even reverse prediabetes.

 

Quitting Smoking

It doesn’t matter how old you are or how long you’ve been smoking, quitting smoking at any time improves your health. When you quit, you are likely to add years to your life, breathe more easily, have more energy, and save money. You will also:

  • Lower your risk of cancer, heart attack, stroke, and lung disease.
  • Have better blood circulation.
  • Improve your sense of taste and smell.
  • Stop smelling like smoke.
  • Set a healthy example for your children and grandchildren.

Quitting smoking isn’t easy. It takes time. And a plan. You don’t have to stop smoking in one day. Find tips, resources, and the support you need to help you quit.

 

Have You Heard of GERD?

GERD stands for gastroesophageal reflux disease. GERD happens when a muscle at the end of your esophagus does not close properly allowing stomach contents to leak back, or reflux, into the esophagus and irritate it. You may feel a burning in your chest or throat called heartburn. There are things you can do to reduce reflux:

  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Learn your trigger foods and avoid them.
  • Don’t smoke.
  • Manage stress.
  • Don’t lie down for 2 or 3 hours after a meal.
  • Talk to your doctor.

Anyone, including infants and children can have GERD. Learn more about the symptoms, medical tests, and treatments.

 

American Indian and Alaska Native Health

Did you know that American Indians are at a greater risk of having diabetes than any other racial group in the United States? Learn more about the issues that disproportionately affect the health of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

 

Green and Black Teas

Green and black teas come from the same plant, Camellia sinensis, but are prepared differently. Tea has been used for medicinal purposes for thousands of years. Find out more about black tea’s interactions with foods, medications, and herbs and supplements.

 

Pumpkin Ricotta Stuffed Shells

Pumpkin ricotta stuffed shells are cheesy, creamy, chewy, and garlicky. They just might be your new favorite fall comfort food.