COCA Now: Multistate Outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 Infections Linked to Chopped Romaine Lettuce

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Multistate Outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 Infections Linked to Chopped Romaine Lettuce

lettuce

CDC, several states, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service are investigating a multistate outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H7 infections. As of April 12, 2018, 35 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported from 11 states.

Information collected to date indicates that chopped romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona growing region could be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 and could make people sick. At this time, no common grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been identified.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from March 22, 2018 to March 31, 2018. Ill people range in age from 12 to 84 years, with a median age of 29. Sixty-nine percent of ill people are female. Twenty-two ill people have been hospitalized, including three people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. No deaths have been reported.

The current outbreak is not related to a recent multistate outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infections linked to leafy greens. People in the previous outbreak were infected with a different DNA fingerprint of E. coli O157:H7 bacteria.

This investigation is ongoing, and CDC will provide updates when more information is available.

To read the full investigation notice, click here. For additional resources, including epi curves, case counts maps, advice to consumers, restaurants, and retailers, as well as the notice in Spanish, click here. For more information about Shiga toxin-producing E. coli and steps that people can take to reduce their risk of infection, click here.