Ward 8 Update Newsletters - June 2, 2016

8th Ward News from Minneapolis Council Vice President Elizabeth Glidden
Visit us at www.minneapolismn.gov/ward8

June 2, 2016

CONTACT INFORMATION

Elizabeth Glidden
350 S. 5th St.
City Hall, Room 307
Minneapolis, MN 55415

Phone: 612-673-2208
elizabeth.glidden@minneapolismn.gov

 

OFFICE HOURS

Every Monday morning, 9-11:00 a.m.
Sabathani Community Center 
310 E 38th Street, 1st floor hallway nearest to the parking lot

Call for an appointment or just
drop by!

 

 

City of Lakes

What a weekend for bicycling!

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ARTCRANK.  Founded in 2007 by Minneapolis' own Charles Youel, ARTCRANK is a "poster party for bike people" that features original bicycle-themed artwork by local artists, at affordable prices. 

Sat June 4, 4-10 pm, Fulton Brewing - NE Mpls, 2540 Northeast 2nd Street, Minneapolis 55418.
http://www.artcrank.com/

Lyndale Open Streets
See you on Lyndale Ave S, Sunday June 5, 11 am - 5 pm, between 22nd and 42nd Streets!  Open streets events will take place all over Minneapolis throughout the summer; one of the best is the original Open Street on Lyndale.  


Monday June 6: 40th Street Pedestrian Bridge Community Meeting featuring

Artist Seitu Jones

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Community Meeting Featuring Draft Public Art Designs 
for the New 40th Street Pedestrian Bridge
Monday, June 6, 6:30-7:30 p.m.
St. Peters AME Church, 401 E 41st St

Join artist Seitu Jones who will be unveiling draft railing concepts for the new 40th Street Pedestrian Bridge spanning I-35W. The project was selected for Art in Public Places—the City’s percent for art program. The Minnesota Department of Transportation (MNDOT) is the lead agency on this project and the City is working in partnership with them on the bridge. Jones is developing public art designs for the railing based on themes of connection, history, culture, nature and movement.

For more information, contact mary.altman@minneapolismn.gov


Preserve Minneapolis Tour: Black History and Its Influence on the

East 38th Street Community

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Join us Tuesday, June 28, at 6:30 pm, at 38th Street & 4th Avenue, for a tour led by community members and sponsored by Preserve Minneapolis. Tour fee is $9.  Register here.

The East 38 Street community is rich with history. African American entrepreneurs, civic, community, and faith leaders, home builders and architects, all contributed to the Minneapolis we know today. From the Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder, the oldest Black-owned business in the State of Minnesota, to the home of Lena Olive Smith, the first Black female lawyer in the State of Minnesota, to Sabathani Community Center, a Black-led non-profit celebrating its 50th Anniversary of service in 2016, there is much to explore.

Discriminatory housing practices, restrictive deed covenants and red-lining are part of the recent history of Minneapolis with present-day impacts.  As recently as the 1950’s, banks and the Federal Housing Administration refused to provide mortgages for homes outside of established Black neighborhoods such as those near the E 38th Street and 4th Avenue corridors.  The Tilsenbilt homes, a group of over 50 homes just south of the E 38th Street Corridor, were constructed in the 1950’s with the help of realtor and philanthropist Archie Givens Sr.  The Tilsenbilt Homes are believed to be the first federally-supported residential housing development in the United States that was open to homebuyers of all races.

Our tour will end with a walk across the 40th Street Pedestrian bridge over I-35W to the Rev Dr Martin Luther King, Jr Park, which was renamed in honor of Dr King in 1968, The construction of I-35W ripped apart neighborhoods, took park land, and set in place patterns of racial segregation that still define our neighborhoods today.


History of South Minneapolis Housing Segregation and Tilsenbilt Homes

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South Minneapolis Housing Segregation and Tilsenbilt Homes
Tuesday, June 21, 6:30-8:00 pm
Judson Memorial Baptist Church, 4101 Harriet Ave South

Join local writer and historian Heidi Adelsman for a discussion of South Minneapolis housing segregation and the Tilsenbilt Homes.

Discriminatory housing practices, restrictive deed covenants and red-lining are part of the recent history of Minneapolis with present-day impacts.  As recently as the 1950’s, banks and the Federal Housing Administration refused to provide mortgages for homes outside of established Black neighborhoods such as those near the E 38th Street and 4th Avenue corridors.  

The Tilsenbilt homes, a group of over 50 homes located on 3rd, 4th and 5th Avenues in the Bryant and Regina neighborhoods, were constructed in the 1950’s by the Tilsen Homes Company with the help of realtor and philanthropist Archie Givens Sr.  The Tilsenbilt Homes are believed to be one of the first federally-supported residential housing development in the United States that was open to homebuyers of all races.

Heidi Adelsman, a South Minneapolis neighbor, has researched and written about the Tilsenbilt Homes and other historic places and events that reveal our history of discriminatory housing practices and segregation in Minneapolis.  Ms. Adelsman will invite a Tilsenbilt home owner to join her as a presenter.  As the Kingfield and Bryant neighborhoods prepare to work with artist Seitu Jones on a rebuilt 40th Street Pedestrian bridge connecting our neighborhoods, we hope you will join us for an important discussion of our shared history.

38th and Chicago Public Parklet

Open for Business!

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Thank you to Smoke in the Pit and Central Area Neighborhood Development Organization (CANDO) for their sponsorship this summer of a public parklet at 38th and Chicago.  The City of Minneapolis's Parklet program allows wiling sponsors to host a parklet open to the public.  The City has two parklet that it rotates each year to different community locations.


All Together Now: Central and Kingfield Neighborhoods to Receive

Inspections Focus

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On June 13, Regulatory Services is launching its annual All Together Now initiative.  Now in its fourth year, All Together Now engages neighborhood organizations, local businesses, and residents to proactively address issues before an inspection happens.  Of the 10 neighborhoods selected for 2016, two are in Ward 8 -- Central and Kingfield neighborhoods.

Inspectors will visit these neighborhoods looking for nuisance violations such as long grass, rubbish, vegetation overhanging the alley or sidewalk, and piles of brush.

Residents and owners in All Together Now neighborhoods will receive a flyer describing common violations, a resource guide for people who may need assistance with yardwork or other services, and a list of local hardware stores who have agreed to provide 10-15% discounts on home improvement supplies. 

More detailed information, including a list of participating businesses and translated flyers, is available on the Regulatory Services website.